Posted in Work

Studio

When I signed up for an urban planning degree I had no idea the extent to which Studio papers would dominate my academic life. These papers teach students about urban design principles, both through learning the various theories and through applying them at different scales. The work is presented on A3 posters, typically as a combination of text and graphics.

For me, these papers were an enormous learning curve, and one that was particularly stressful in the first semester. To produce work to a suitable standard we were expected to use Photoshop, and, later, AutoCad, and these are not easy things to learn while also trying to produce work for submission. Photoshop is not at all intuitive when you’re trying to get to grips with it, and even after two and a half years my skills are very basic.

My friends and family have heard and seen how much my Studio papers have dominated my university life. Each assignment would require so much work – not just to digest design theories and come up with concepts, but to physically produce the posters for submission. We also typically had to write a 1,500 word report to support each project. Formatting pages in Photoshop is such a laborious process, and pretty much the worst kind of task for anybody with latent perfectionist tendencies (like me): you can’t help but want to make sure every line is perfect, and it’s exhausting. Our tutors would work with us on a consultation basis: we’d produce work, they’d critique it, we’d try to fix it, they’d critique it some more, we’d try to fix it again, we’d cry, we’d threaten to drop out, and we’d finish everything at the last minute. Because of the nature of the consultative process, it was seldom possible to finalise design decisions until late in the project, because you would continually refine your work in response to tutor feedback and the theoretical stuff you were reading.

However, a fortnight ago I finished the final studio assignment of my degree – a cause for great celebration. So, for your viewing pleasure, here’s a sample page from each of my assignments. Amongst many other things, it shows how my design skills have improved, albeit very slightly…

First Year

1: Street scape study

This was an attempt to learn about the principles of urban design (legibility, permeability, etc). The Photoshop skills required for this one nearly killed me.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.08.44 am

2. Residential typologies

We were allocated different residential typologies and had to find a good example of our option, and write about it. My example was a cool building in Zurich.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.13.25 am

3: Designing an apartment building

We were allocated an existing residential site and had to demolish the house and replace it with a small apartment building, which we had to design. I tried to design a family-friendly building, to challenge the idea that families in New Zealand can only live comfortably in detached houses. We were expected to hand draw all of our plans, which was seriously challenging.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.16.22 am

4. Analysing a block and its surrounding area

This was my least-favourite assignment of the entire degree…

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.19.48 am

5. Redesigning a low density housing area

This was the continuation of the last assignment, and involved redesigning the street network, and replacing low density housing with apartments.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.24.15 am

Second Year

6. Analysing my neighbourhood

This and the following assignment were my favourites – I love working at this scale, and I want to specialise in community design when I’ve graduated. In this assignment, we analysed our own neighbourhoods according to neighbourhood design principles, which included producing a hand-drawn map from memory, to see how we actually perceive where we live (blank spaces in some annotations are the result of me removing identifying information).

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.26.39 am

7. Neighbourhood redesign

I absolutely LOVED this assignment. We were allocated a neighbourhood near where we lived, and had to redesign it to better incorporate design principles (to support things like a better pedestrian experience – with smaller blocks and fewer cul-de-sacs, for example) and higher density housing to complement existing low density housing.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.29.32 am

8. Designing according to the Unitary Plan

The Unitary Plan is the document that will shape Auckland for decades to come, but there are many questions regarding the design outcomes that are likely as a result of its rules. For this assignment we had to redesign a site in accordance with the Unitary Plan.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.31.33 am

9. Designing a town centre

For this project we had to redesign an area designated by the Unitary Plan as a town centre. We were told that the design had to include a central plaza, so this was mine. I made use of a lot of photos I’d taken in France, to illustrate my design ideas. This was also my first time designing with AutoCad, which was wonderful once I got used to it: so much easier to make changes.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.33.21 am

Third Year

10. A ‘catalogue’ for a future design

This assignment involved developing a ‘catalogue’ of buildings, in order to design according to the guidance provided for creating a Pedestrian Pocket (a transit-oriented development).

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.35.34 am

11. Regional design strategy

For this assignment we wrote a big literature review to explore concepts related to regional growth strategies, and supplemented it with a proposed strategy to add 70,000 new dwellings to a currently-rural part of Auckland.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.37.59 am

12. Group regional growth strategy

For our second-to-last assignment we had to work in small groups, collectively refine our regional growth strategies, and write a report to explain our decisions.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.40.31 am

13. Transit-oriented Development

My last Studio assignment! I designed a transit-oriented development, designed to provide housing for around 4,000 people, and jobs for around 8,000 people (using a lot of the ‘catalogue’ I developed from a few assignments earlier).

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 8.42.24 am

Despite the huge amount of work involved, and the severe stress and sleep deprivation that producing assignments often entailed, I did really enjoy this component of the degree – no feeling at uni matched the satisfaction of finishing these enormous projects, or of getting good grades for them. Although I don’t intend to pursue an urban design career as a practitioner, the area of the field upon which I would like to focus will definitely make good use of the knowledge and experience I’ve gained. 

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